Aikido and Medicine

ἐπὶ δηλήσει δὲ καὶ ἀδικίῃ εἴρξειν
“Refrain from both injury and injustice.”
(Usually translated as: “First, do no harm.”)
-Hippocrates of Kos

真武不殺
“True budo doesn’t kill.”
-Ueshiba Morihei

Aikido is not a solo art; it is practiced in pairs: Nage and Uke, the thrower and the receiver.  Uke can be thought of initiating the interaction with an attack, and Nage responding with a throw or technique. But in true Aikido, Nage is engaging Uke before the attack even begins.

“…of all the people in the world,
they have chosen you to attack.”

-Terry Dobson (founder of Vermont Aikido)

Uke is a person out of balance, physically and spiritually. Uke has chosen Nage to try to connect with, albeit in a negative manner: with an attack. A martial artist trains to respond to the situation of an attack. The response may be of overwhelming force to destroy the attacker, or it may be in kind, to merely limit the harm done. Ueshiba “O-Sensei”, the founder of Aikido, says a true martial artist has a responsibility to respond without harm. Aikido teaches us to respond in a way that limits an attacker’s options and ability to harm, not to destroy the attacker.

I have recently come to use the Aikido interaction as a metaphor for the interactions in my profession as a physician. A patient is out of balance and has an illness. The patient presents to a doctor, and the doctor must work with the patient to effect a return to balance, a “cure.” But a true doctor trains to respond in those times of crisis or tipping points of health. He or she engages with the patient, and with the disease, before the presentation of an individual interaction. Training and experience allow this sense of engagement with the disease, but engagement with the patient, the individual out of balance, must be consciously recognized.

“The Way of the Warrior has been misunderstood. It is not a means to kill and destroy others. Those who seek to compete and better one another are making a terrible mistake. To smash, injure, or destroy is the worst thing a human being can do. The real Way of a Warrior is to prevent such slaughter–
it is the Art of Peace, the power of love.”

-Ueshiba Morihei

In the same way that a martial artist can respond to an attack either with overwhelming force to destroy, or with a blending response to dissipate without harm, a physician can respond to a patient with opposing force or a blended response. I am a surgeon, and the stereotype of a surgeon is of a quick responder who attacks disease directly. I have found that taking a little time to know a little more about the patient who comes to see me, to learn their balance points and then individualize my response, creates a cooperative operative plan.

I find that my movement during surgery and Aikido has a similarity, also. When Aikido is working well, Nage moves in a way that does not provoke resistance in Uke; Nage traces the path of no resistance. Likewise surgery is without resistance. My mind traces the structures of anatomy, and my scalpel draws the line between, without resistance and minimizing trauma.

I’ve found that both Aikido and medicine are models of interactions between people with balance and grace. I plan to continue to practice both.

Thank you,
Donald Laub, MD (1st kyu)

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